People

Wolfgang Kupke plays the university organ

The Sauer organ will now be resounding throughout the main assembly hall more often: In July, university organist Professor Wolfgang Kupke and the University of Halle’s Association of Friends and Sponsors (VFF) hosted the first in a series of concerts that will place the precious instrument firmly back on the university’s musical agenda.

„Genscher helped open doors“

Hans-Dietrich Genscher began his law studies at the University of Halle in 1946. Until his death in late March 2016, the former German foreign minister and famous son of Halle maintained a close relationship with his alma mater. He was particularly active on behalf of the university in the years after German Reunification in 1990. The rector at the time, Professor Günther Schilling, reminisces about an extraordinary politician and his achievements on behalf of the university.

Ingrid Mertig

“Success means having scientific insight”

If it wasn’t for Professor Ingrid Mertig, Nobel laureate Albert Fert would not be visiting the Weinberg Campus as often as he does. And perhaps Humboldt Professor Stuart Parkin wouldn’t have decided to come to the University of Halle. Mertig has been teaching and conducting research at Martin Luther University for the past 15 years as a professor of quantum theory of the solid state. Here she has built up the key research area “nanostructured materials”, which she has decisively shaped over the years as the spokesperson for the collaborative research centre (CRC) “Functionality of Oxidic Interfaces”.

Fascinated by plants

Humboldt Professor Tiffany Knight studies the changes of ecosystems over long periods of time and the effects that a loss of biodiversity may have on the ecosystem. In February 2016, the affiliation of the renowned US-scientist changed from the Midwestern US to Central Germany. She is now working at the German Center of Integrative Biodiversity Research (iDiv) Halle-Jena-Leipzig.

Unforgotten injustice

Guido Kisch and Heiner Lück are connected by more than just the fact that Lück has held Kisch’s former chair at the University of Halle for nearly 20 years. Since his time as a student, Lück has been examining the biography of the Jewish legal scholar who was a professor in Halle for eleven years until he was banned from his profession in 1933. Today Kisch’s family are friends with Heiner Lück.